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CR: Existing Home Inventory is up 7.5% year-to-date on March 25th

Existing Home Inventory is up 7.5% year-to-date on March 25th

by Bill McBride on 3/25/2013 

Weekly Update: One of key questions for 2013 is Will Housing inventory bottom this year?. Since this is a very important question, I’m tracking inventory weekly this year.

In normal times, there is a clear seasonal pattern for inventory, with the low point for inventory in late December or early January, and then peaking in mid-to-late summer.

The NAR data is monthly and released with a lag.  However Ben at Housing Tracker (Department of Numbers) has provided me some weekly inventory data for the last several years. This is displayed on the graph below as a percentage change from the first week of the year (to normalize the data).

In 2010 (blue), inventory followed the normal seasonal pattern, however in 2011 and 2012, there was only a small increase in inventory early in the year, followed by a sharp decline for the rest of the year.

So far – through March 25th – inventory is increasing faster than in 2011 and 2012. Housing Tracker reports inventory is down -21.2% compared to the same week in 2012 – still a rapid year-over-year decline.

Exsiting Home Sales Weekly dataClick on graph for larger image.

Note: the data is a little weird for early 2011 (spikes down briefly).

In 2010, inventory was up 15% by the end of March, and close to 20% by the end of April.

For 2011 and 2012, inventory only increased about 5% at the peak and then declined for the remainder of the year.

So far in 2013, inventory is up 7.5% (above the peak percentage increase for 2011 and 2012) Right now I think inventory will not bottom until 2014, but it is still possible that inventory will bottom this yea

Read more at http://www.calculatedriskblog.com/2013/03/existing-home-inventory-is-up-75-year.html#WpOCS7ccU6hgPa1U.99

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CR: Existing Home Inventory up 3.6% year-to-date in late February

Existing Home Inventory up 3.6% year-to-date in late February

by Bill McBride on 2/25/2013  

Weekly Update: One of key questions for 2013 is Will Housing inventory bottom this year?. Since this is a very important question, I’ll be tracking inventory weekly for the next few months.

If inventory does bottom, we probably will not know for sure until late in the year. In normal times, there is a clear seasonal pattern for inventory, with the low point for inventory in late December or early January, and then peaking in mid-to-late summer.

The NAR data is monthly and released with a lag.  However Ben at Housing Tracker (Department of Numbers) kindly sent me some weekly inventory data for the last several years. This is displayed on the graph below as a percentage change from the first week of the year.

In 2010 (blue), inventory followed the normal seasonal pattern, however in 2011 and 2012, there was only a small increase in inventory early in the year, followed by a sharp decline for the rest of the year.

So far – through late February – it appears inventory is increasing at a sluggish rate.

Exsiting Home Sales Weekly dataClick on graph for larger image.

Note: the data is a little weird for early 2011 (spikes down briefly).

The key will be to see how much inventory increases over the next few months. In 2010, inventory was up 8% by early March, and up 15% by the end of March.

For 2011 and 2012, inventory only increased about 5% at the peak.

So far in 2013, inventory is up 3.6%.   If inventory doesn’t increase more soon, then the bottom for inventory might not be until 2014.

Read more at http://www.calculatedriskblog.com/2013/02/existing-home-inventory-up-36-year-to.html#sY2JS9L3XSYtKg8I.99

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CR: Housing: Inventory down 22% year-over-year in early February

Housing: Inventory down 22% year-over-year in early February

by Bill McBride on 2/04/2013  

Inventory declines every year in December and January as potential sellers take their homes off the market for the holidays – and then starts increasing again in February. That is why it helps to look at the year-over-year change in inventory.

According to the deptofnumbers.com for (54 metro areas), overall inventory is down 22.2% year-over-year in early February and up slightly from January (on a monthly basis).

This graph shows the NAR estimate of existing home inventory through December (left axis) and the HousingTracker data for the 54 metro areas through early February.

NAR vs. HousingTracker.net Existing Home InventoryClick on graph for larger image.

Since the NAR released their revisions for sales and inventory in 2011, the NAR and HousingTracker inventory numbers have tracked pretty well.

On a seasonal basis, housing inventory usually bottoms during the holidays and then starts increasing in February – and peaks in mid-summer.  So inventory will probably increase for the next 6+ months.

The second graph shows the year-over-year change in inventory for both the NAR and HousingTracker.

HousingTracker.net YoY Home InventoryHousingTracker reported that the early February listings, for the 54 metro areas, declined 22.2% from the same period last year.

The year-over-year declines will probably start to get smaller since inventory is already very low.

One of key questions for 2013 is Will Housing inventory bottom this year?. Since this is a very important question, I’m also tracking inventory weekly this year.

If inventory does bottom, we probably will not know for sure until late in the year.  Ben at Housing Tracker (Department of Numbers) has provided me weekly inventory data for the last several years and this is displayed on the graph below as a percentage change from the first week of the year.

Exsiting Home Sales Weekly dataIn 2010 (blue), inventory followed the normal seasonal pattern, however in 2011 and 2012, there was only a small increase in inventory early in the year, followed by a sharp decline for the rest of the year.

Note: the data is a little weird for early 2011 (spikes down briefly).

The key will be to see how much inventory increases over the next few months. In 2010, inventory was up 8% by early March, and up 15% by the end of March.

For 2011 and 2012, inventory only increased about 5% at the peak.

So far in 2013, even with the slight decline last week (probably noise), inventory is already up 3.0%.  The next few months will be very interesting for inventory!

Read more at http://www.calculatedriskblog.com/2013/02/housing-inventory-down-22-year-over.html#Y8WJpwsdX3TrvrkF.99

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Calculated Risk: Housing: Inventory down 24% year-over-year in early January

Housing: Inventory down 24% year-over-year in early January

by Bill McBride on 1/07/2013 

Inventory declines every year in December and January as potential sellers take their homes off the market for the holidays. That is why it helps to look at the year-over-year change in inventory.

According to the deptofnumbers.com for (54 metro areas), overall inventory is down 23.9% year-over-year in early January, and probably at the lowest level since the early ’00s.

This graph shows the NAR estimate of existing home inventory through November (left axis) and the HousingTracker data for the 54 metro areas through early January.

NAR vs. HousingTracker.net Existing Home InventoryClick on graph for larger image.

Since the NAR released their revisions for sales and inventory in 2011, the NAR and HousingTracker inventory numbers have tracked pretty well.

On a seasonal basis, housing inventory usually bottoms during the holidays and then starts increasing in February – and peaks in mid-summer.  So inventory is probably near the seasonal bottom right now and should start increasing again soon.

The second graph shows the year-over-year change in inventory for both the NAR and HousingTracker.

HousingTracker.net YoY Home InventoryHousingTracker reported that the early January listings, for the 54 metro areas, declined 23.9% from the same period last year.

The year-over-year declines will probably start to get smaller since inventory is already very low. It seems very unlikely we will see 20%+ year-over-year declines this summer, and I think overall inventory might be bottoming right now.

Read more at http://www.calculatedriskblog.com/2013/01/housing-inventory-down-24-year-over.html#7GwlQxiXCGgUO2TY.99

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Report: Housing Inventory declines 17% year-over-year in November

Report: Housing Inventory declines 17% year-over-year in November

by Bill McBride on 12/18/2012 

From Realtor.com: November 2012 Real Estate Data

Flat list prices—a leading indicator of future house price trends—most likely signal a slowdown in the recent rate of house price appreciation. At the same time, historically low inventories suggest that significant price concessions on the part of home sellers may be coming to an end. How these potentially offsetting trends play out in the housing market will depend on a variety of factors, including potential buyers’ optimism regarding the continued strength of the overall economy.

The total U.S. for-sale inventory of single family homes, condos, townhomes and co-ops (SFH/CTHCOPS) dropped to its lowest point since 2007, with 1.674 million units for sale in November, down 16.87 percent compared to a year ago and more than 45 percent below its peak of 3.1 million units in September 2007, when Realtor.com began monitoring these markets. The median age of the inventory was also down by 11.4 percent on a year-over-year basis. However, the median list price in November ($189,900) was the same as it was a year ago despite the significant gains observed earlier in the year.

The national for-sale inventory of SFH/CTHCOPS in November (1,674,412) decreased (4.69 percent) from what it was in October and was down by 16.87 percent on an annual basis.

Note: Realtor.com only started tracking inventory in September 2007, but this is probably the lowest level in a decade.  On a month-over-month basis, inventory declined 4.7%, and declined in 133 of 146 markets.

Going forward, I expect to see smaller year-over-year declines simply because inventory is already very low.

The NAR is scheduled to report November existing home sales and inventory on Thursday, December 20th. A key number in the NAR report will be inventory, and inventory will be down sharply again year-over-year in November.

Read more at http://www.calculatedriskblog.com/2012/12/report-housing-inventory-declines-17.html#zQGJcepLyUupW30o.99

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Existing Home Sales: A few comments and NSA Sales Graph

Existing Home Sales: A few comments and NSA Sales Graph

by Bill McBride on 10/19/2012 

This was a solid report, not because of sales, but because of the level of inventory. Based on historical turnover rates, I think “normal” sales would be in the 4.5 to 5.0 million range. So, existing home sales at 4.75 million are in the normal range.

Of course a “normal” market would have very few distressed sales, so there is still a long ways to go, but the market is headed in the right direction. Note: No one should expect existing home sales to go back to 6 or 7 million per year. Instead the key to returning to “normal” are more conventional sales and fewer distressed sales.

From the NAR this morning:

Distressed homes – foreclosures and short sales sold at deep discounts – accounted for 24 percent of September sales (13 percent were foreclosures and 11 percent were short sales), up from 22 percent in August; they were 30 percent in September 2011

I’m not confident in the NAR distressed sales measurement (it is from an unscientific survey of Realtors), but other sources also suggest distressed sales have fallen in many areas.

Some quick calculations: According to the NAR, existing home sales in September were at a 4.75 million annual rate with 24% distressed sales. That would suggest conventional sales at a 3.61 million annual rate.

In September 2011, sales were at a 4.28 million annual rate with 30% distressed. That would suggest conventional sales were at a 3.0 million annual rate in September 2011. So conventional sales in September 2012 were up about 20% from a year ago.

Also, according to the NAR, the percent of distressed sales peaked in March 2009 at just under 50% when total sales were at a 3.94 million sales rate. That would suggest conventional sales were at a 2.0 million sales rate in March 2009, and that conventional sales are up about 80% from the bottom! If we were confident in the NAR data, this would be the number to watch.

Of course what matters the most in the NAR’s existing home sales report is inventory. It is active inventory that impacts prices (although the “shadow” inventory will keep prices from rising). For existing home sales, look at inventory first and then at the percent of conventional sales.

The NAR reported inventory decreased to 2.32 million units in September, down from 2.40 million in August. This is down 20.0% from September 2011, and down 16% from the inventory level in September 2005 (mid-2005 was when inventory started increasing sharply). This is the lowest level for the month of September since 2002.

Important: The NAR reports active listings, and although there is some variability across the country in what is considered active, most “contingent short sales” are not included. “Contingent short sales” are strange listings since the listings were frequently NEVER on the market (they were listed as contingent), and they hang around for a long time – they are probably more closely related to shadow inventory than active inventory. However when we compare inventory to 2005, we need to remember there were no “short sale contingent” listings in 2005. In the areas I track, the number of “short sale contingent” listings is also down sharply year-over-year.

Existing Home Inventory monthlyClick on graph for larger image.

This graph shows inventory by month since 2004. In 2005 (dark blue columns), inventory kept rising all year – and that was a clear sign that the housing bubble was ending.

This year (dark red for 2012) inventory is at the lowest level for the month of September since 2002, and inventory is below the level in September 2005 (not counting contingent sales). All year I’ve been arguing months-of-supply would be below 6 towards the end of the year, and months-of-supply fell to 5.9 months in September (a normal range).

The following graph shows existing home sales Not Seasonally Adjusted (NSA).

Existing Home Sales NSASales NSA in September (red column) are only slightly above last year (there were 2 fewer selling days). Sales are well below the bubble years of 2005 and 2006, and also below 2007.

Read more at http://www.calculatedriskblog.com/2012/10/existing-home-sales-few-comments-and.html

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Existing Home Sales in September: 4.75 million SAAR, 5.9 months

Existing Home Sales in September: 4.75 million SAAR, 5.9 months

by Bill McBride on 10/19/2012 

The NAR reports: September Existing-Home Sales Down but Prices Continue to Improve

Total existing-home sales, which are completed transactions that include single-family homes, townhomes, condominiums and co-ops, fell 1.7 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.75 million in September from an upwardly revised 4.83 million in August, but are 11.0 percent above the 4.28 million-unit pace in September 2011.

Total housing inventory at the end September fell 3.3 percent to 2.32 million existing homes available for sale, which represents a 5.9-month supply at the current sales pace, down from a 6.0-month supply in August. Listed inventory is 20.0 percent below a year ago when there was an 8.1-month supply.

Existing Home SalesClick on graph for larger image.

This graph shows existing home sales, on a Seasonally Adjusted Annual Rate (SAAR) basis since 1993.

Sales in September 2012 (4.75 million SAAR) were 1.7% lower than last month, and were 11.0% above the September 2011 rate.

The second graph shows nationwide inventory for existing homes.

Existing Home InventoryAccording to the NAR, inventory declined to 2.32 million in September down from 2.40 million in August. Inventory is not seasonally adjusted, and usually inventory increases from the seasonal lows in December and January to the seasonal high in mid-summer.

The last graph shows the year-over-year (YoY) change in reported existing home inventory and months-of-supply. Since inventory is not seasonally adjusted, it really helps to look at the YoY change. Note: Months-of-supply is based on the seasonally adjusted sales and not seasonally adjusted inventory.

Year-over-year InventoryInventory decreased 20.0% year-over-year in September from September 2011. This is the 19th consecutive month with a YoY decrease in inventory.

Months of supply declined to 5.9 months in September.

This was at expectations of sales of 4.75 million. For existing home sales, the key number is inventory – and the sharp year-over-year decline in inventory is a positive for housing. I’ll have more later …

Read more at http://www.calculatedriskblog.com/2012/10/existing-home-sales-in-september-475.html

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